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    Posts Tagged ‘Flixel’

    First LudumDare behind me

    Posted by
    Sunday, August 24th, 2014 5:22 pm

    OK, it’s 2AM here in Czech Republic and i think my first LD game won’t get any better. And I’m too sleepy to write a blog post…

    It’s more experiment  rather than complete game, but it was great experience and I’ve enjoyed making the graphs…

    Windows 7

    FlashDevelop

    as3 & flixel

    Photoshop

    bfxr

    This is my first ludum dare and i am excited

    Posted by
    Tuesday, August 19th, 2014 11:06 am

    Hello everybody.This is my first ludum dare and i am very excited.I hope ludum dare will be funny for me.

    Tools:

    Language:Action Script 3

    Engine:Flixel

    IDE:FlashDevelop

    Graphics:Inkscape

    Sound:I think i will use free sound packets.

    Entity Management

    Posted by (twitter: @nico_m__)
    Monday, May 12th, 2014 6:40 pm

    So I’ve been making small changes and additions to what was my Ludum Dare basecode, and its getting to the point where I think it might actually be useful for other people. This begs the question: What do people actually need/want in an entity/component management system? Anything you can think of, please post in the comments, or tweet to me @nico_m__

     

    Note that my system is for HaxeFlixel, and is already available on github, the point of this post is just as a general question though, whether you use flixel or not, what would you want/need in an entity/component management system?

     

    Thanks:),

    Nico

    I’m back in!

    Posted by (twitter: @Cirrial)
    Friday, April 25th, 2014 1:50 am

    After throwing a hissy fit over the theme last time I’ve decided, on retrospect, that the issue wasn’t with the theme, but with my incredibly narrow and literal-minded interpretation of the theme.

    So I’m back in and I’m going to figure out something for this theme regardless of how much I’m inevitably going to hate it.

    Stuff:

    • IntelliJ – Code
    • Flixel – Framework
    • Pickle – Graphics
    • AutoTileGen – Graphics
    • Bfxr – Sound
    • DAME – Map Editor
    • Sunvox – Music (ahaha unlikely)

    Here’s hoping this time around goes better than last!

    4th Time In!

    Posted by (twitter: @TomboFry)
    Saturday, April 12th, 2014 6:11 pm

    Hey guys, I’ve been taking part in the Ludum Dare competitions since April last year, and it would be an honour to take part for another year!

    This time, I’ll be switching up my tools. Last year I primarily used Game Maker 8 on Windows, however I’ve recently turned to free solutions instead:

    • IDE: Sublime Text 3
    • Framework: HaxeFlixel (Haxe/OpenFL/Flixel). Definitely check it out if you haven’t already. It’s absolutely fantastic! (apparently they’ll be supporting consoles soon, that’s awesome!)
    • Art/Asset creation: GIMP
    • elementary OS. It’s a free Linux operating system based on Ubuntu. It looks amazing, and it’s lightning fast. Not sure about livestreaming with it though. We’ll see, I’ll do some tests soon.
    • As for music, I’ll switch over to Windows 7 half way through to use FL Studio.

    The game I make will be uploaded to Itch.io, GameJolt, IndieDB, and the Google Play Store (see point below)

    Expect the game I make to be released on all desktop operating systems (either Flash or native compilations), and Android Phones and Tablets. I will likely design the game with phones in mind.

    Good luck everybody!

    Post-Competition Release: The Labyrinth of Keys

    Posted by (twitter: @Martze)
    Thursday, January 2nd, 2014 11:39 am

    http://mattarod.com/labyrinth-of-keys/

    start

     

    Although it was not completed in time for the Jam, we would like to share the game we started for Ludum Dare 28.

    More details at the link above.

     

     

    One – Postmortem

    Posted by (twitter: @CuveGames)
    Tuesday, December 31st, 2013 5:30 am

    screenshot1

     

    Hi guys and fellow devs,

    Just wanted to hop in the postmortem wagon and let you learn a bit more about how I worked on “One”, my LD28 entry. English isn’t my mother tongue, so be ready to read approximate french-glish.

    If you’re interested, you can first test my game here.

    The Concept

    When I heard about the theme, I got a little disappointed because I voted against it, for the simple reason it didn’t inspire me that much. I almost gave up on participating. My first idea was to make a game about getting only one seed in an arid world, but it was too complicated and, in my opinion, not original enough.

    I was a bit depressed that saturday, the sky was dark. Thinking about the LD smoking my cigarette outside, I suddenly decided to cheer myself up by cheering other up, and I decided to make the happiest and cutest game I was able to do in 48h.

    With that in mind, I thought about the theme again and remembered that one dream I used to have which filled me with happiness. In this dream I wasn’t flying but jumping so high, and falling so hard ! It was fun and magic. I decided to turn that into a small game.

    For those who didn’t play the game, the game is about a little child who learn to jump up to the stars. Little light balls help you to get higher and higher.

    The Scope

    I’m what you could call a experienced dev, with more than 20 games released in my career, and 4-5 game jams. After several years, I’m now experienced with scoping a game. My advice is to always go for the simplest idea you can have. Because during the course of development, either for a full game or a jam, you’ll always spend twice the time you planned on small things like researching, debugging, adding signs and feedback, etc. We always tend to underestimate the details, so focusing on the simplest idea and growing from there is often the best solution.

    Programming

    I used Flixel, which is, in my experience, one of the best technology for game jams, for two reasons : it’s perfect to create very small projects in a very short time, and it’s meant to be distributed online, as it’s Flash based. The second is useful for LD because people tend to test games with Web version more (it’s far from being enough to get a lot of ratings, but it helps a bit).

    My idea for One was so simple I managed to tackle gameplay code in a couple of hours. I love when it goes that way, because I know I can use plenty of time to make art, music and moreover add signs & feedbacks.

    No Instruction

    Several people have been surprised, playing One, that there isn’t any instruction. Well it’s been a choice. I love to do game jams to experiment with ergonomics. Having no instruction is a risky challenge. If it’s done right it helps immersion and focusing on the message of the game. If done wrong, it simply ruins the whole experience. So far, I don’t think anybody really got stuck in the game, so I would say I’ve done it right this time !

    Here are a non-exhaustive list of simple things I implemented to make sure players learn how to play by themselves :

    – Control scheme : as intuitive as possible, only three buttons (left, right and up). Duplicated on ZQD and QWD

    – At least one bonus is visible on screen at start, encouraging to reach it and learn to jump and move.

    – Audio feedback when touching bonus and also when reaching the current max altitude, hinting a bit on what to do.

    – Midgame, my texts help a bit, by notifying that there’s more to discover upward.

    Art

    I’ve worked with Photoshop. I’ve made backgrounds mainly using a brush to get this cloudy aspect. I didn’t want to spend too much time on animation so I made only a few poses of the character, mixing pixel art and painting techniques.

    Music

    Surprisingly, I spent most of my time on music, with at least 4 hours spent on it. I must say I got a little carried :) I really enjoyed making it, so I wasn’t able to stop until I was satisfied with that small piece.

    What went right

    This LD went really well, for the main reason I did a game with a message and an intention in mind, I think. Working with the purpose of sharing a bit of love and poetry is wonderful. I managed to do a little something I’m proud of in far less than 48h because I didn’t get too ambitious and managed to focus on a simple idea and make the best I could of it.

    What went wrong

    The game was a bit oversized, and loaded from a website it discouraged some of my early testers. They complained it wasn’t working because I forgot to add a preloader : the page showed a blank page for around a minute. I hope those early testers didn’t rate the game too bad. I also stupidly forgot to proof-read my texts and let a small typo in the game (which I corrected later, as I learned it was allowed).

    Conclusion

    Make game with love, message and passion, focus on a simple idea but don’t forget about the little details ! Happy new year everyone, and let 2014 be filled with hope, love and plenty of wonderful games ! I think games can help the world be a better place, so keep going guys, I love you all.

    –Jérôme

    You can reach me at contact [at] cuvegames.com if you have any question or feedback which I would love to have. 

     

    0RBITALIS – Post Mortem

    Posted by (twitter: @AlanZucconi)
    Monday, December 30th, 2013 1:08 pm

    Here it is my post mortem about 0RBITALIS. For this game I got inspiration looking at other themes in the final round. It’s hard to make a game that is as vague as “You Only Get One”, but when you couple it with “Gravity” and “Chaos” it’s much clearer what you can actually do. I have always been interested in games which explore how simple rules (such as Netwon’s laws) can generate beautifully complex behaviours.

     

    Most of the “features” of the game are actually consequences of the strong time constraints Ludum Dare imposed me. For instance, mi initial idea was to have a moving camera that could zoom in and out, but I didn’t have time to code it properly. And this automatically lead to a “stay in the system” mechanic. The vector fields that you can see in the background was a debug tool I used to test and calibrate planets’ masses, but when I realised that it was fitting nicely with the style, I decided to leave it there. 

    SW4bPqM zcQdNS2

    Since the very beginning of the voting period, 0RBITALIS got a lot of attention: so far, it’s both the most voted and commented entry in the 48 hours competition. I think part of its success is due to its aesthetic: it’s simple, yet effective. I spent lot of time polishing the game rather then designing more levels. This can really do the difference, especially when games are picked almost exclusively by how appealing their screenshots look like. 0RBITALIS has doing unexpectedly well. For this reason I am already working on a full-game version that will include both more levels and new mechanics. There will be probing missions, for instance, which require to scan a celestial body for a certain time. I am already working on landing missions as well, but I’d rather keep them mysterious for now!

    2WgVD17 q4SnfOn 

    Since I *hate* menus, 0RBITALIS won’t have one. I am working on a different system, however, that looks like a star chart. Player will be able to select levels and to change settings just touching and connecting stars. I also collected lot of statistics about levels but… I’ll keep them for another post!

    If you liked the game, you’re more then welcomed to vote it or leave a comment on its LD48 entry page. If you want to follow 0RBITALIS news and further development, you can find me on Twitter as @AlanZucconi.

    What I’ve Learned from not Finishing: A Postmortem

    Posted by (twitter: @gamepopper)
    Wednesday, December 18th, 2013 4:44 pm

    Hey all! I’ve been enjoying a lot of games from this Ludum Dare, and I hope you all have to. I participated myself in the jam, collaborating with another indie game dev known as Code_Assassin. However, through details I’ll explain below, we didn’t finish. While we did submit an entry, it wasn’t a finished game like we hoped, and after a day of thought, we requested the entry to be taken down, and the game removed from Newgrounds.

    The idea

    Our game originally started off with a premise of finding a mob boss out of a group of people, the levels and the clues would be random each time, but you only had one chance at killing the boss. We agreed on using Flixel as our framework due to its ease of use, my experience from using it in last year’s Ludum Dare and CA’s experience with Actionscript3, and that we could upload it to the web. We got a Git repository set up and we were hyped up and ready to go!

    (more…)

    Progress on my first Ludum Dare game!

    Posted by
    Saturday, December 14th, 2013 9:35 am

    I decided to make a LD48 game too! It’s about trying to dock a spaceship into a fuel station with realistic Box2D physics for extra QWOP-iness. You have one tiny fuel tank and limited electric charge. The realistic physics make it hard to simply move and dock, but you still need to dock to the station before you run out of electric charge or fuel.

    The fuel station and fuel/charge gauges aren’t implemented yet, but you can fly the spacecraft with WASD.

    Here’s a screenshot:

    spacedock

    Here is a playable demo: link

    I used Blender3D for the graphics, Box2D for the physics, and Flixel as a game engine.

    Happy coding everyone!

     

     

     

     

     

    So, I’m making a game or something!

    Posted by
    Friday, December 13th, 2013 10:21 am

    First Ludum Dare I’ve participated in!

    Engine: HaxeFlixel (probably using some code from the demos)

    IDE: FlashDevelop

    Graphics: Inkscape + Gimp

    Sound: Sfxr + Audacity

    Music: Probably Musagi

    Tilemaps (if I decide I need tilemaps): Tiled

    I am in! Second Ludum Dare!

    Posted by (twitter: @gamepopper)
    Friday, December 13th, 2013 5:11 am

    I was the one who made the unusually challenging 10 Second Paper Flight. This will probably be a hectic Ludum Dare for me since I’ll be at a Christmas Party on the Saturday and work on the Monday, but what the hell, I like making games and I can use some of Saturday to plan something interesting.

    Anyways, I plan to use the following tools:

    • GitHub (Source Control, my first ever solo project to use source control :O)
    • HaxeFlixel (Game Libraries)
    • Paint.Net (Graphics)
    • Tiled (Possible Level Design)
    • iNudge (Possible music)
    • Bfxr (Sound Effects)

    My plans/advice so far for the jam, based on last Ludum Dare:

    • Plan well.
    • Constantly show your progress.
    • Graphics and Music are just as important as the game itself.
    • Know how and where you will distribute your game.
    • Everyone likes Time Lapse vids
    • Follow the 621 (Sleep, Food and Clean Yourself :P)

    Everyone have a good Ludum Dare!

    I’m in for LD 28 Jam

    Posted by (twitter: @outcastpixel)
    Wednesday, December 4th, 2013 10:52 am

    I’m in again for the LD 28 Jam.  This is my second Ludum Dare and I’m excited to be taking part again!  Hoping to actually get something finished that is in a workable state.

    I’ll be using ActionScript with Flixel.  Adobe Suite, including Flash Builder.  Possibly Logic for music.

    Changed from the Compo to the Jam to give myself more time and the possibility of working with someone else.  Looking for a pixel artist.  ;-)

    Jamming with OpenFL

    Posted by (twitter: @wilbefast)
    Sunday, September 8th, 2013 12:06 pm

    Time for our post-mortem :)

    I won’t re-introduce the team, you can go to our “we’re in” post for that. Basically there were 3 of us and we’re pretty awesome!

    So what happened?

    Well, we made a time-bending tower-defence game called “10 Second Onslaught”. It’s about an onslaught you see, and the onslaught in question lasts 10 seconds:

    10 second onslaught awesome

    The game wasn’t really “finished” after 72 hours even though it’s completely playable. I’m actually glad we were over-ambitious though: it’s a good beginning and something I’m still working on (in a separate branch of course ;) )

    What went well?

    The art pipline was probably the one thing that went particularly well. Thomas is really a 3D artist, so soon reverted back from pixel art to making models and rendering them to bitmaps. To speed things up I wrote a couple of little ImageMagick scripts to mirror and then stick these images together into sheets. Then it was just a matter of using the haxelib spritesheet to have animated characters in the game :)

    What went badly?

    For various reasons, mostly the technology (OpenFL) being something only I had ever used before, I ended up writing a majority of the code, which is just stupid. Next time we’re going to have to organise ourselves better.

    Read on for a rather long discussion of OpenFL, including comparisons to Unity 3D and Löve 2D…

    (more…)


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