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Ludum Dare 29 — April 25th-28th Weekend [9 PM EST] — Theme: ??? (Slaughter Ends Soon!)
  • Ludum Dare 29 Compo (48 Hour+Solo+Scratch+Src) Begins: in 7 days, 1 hour, 44 minutes, 0 seconds
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    Posts Tagged ‘flashpunk’

    Ricochere

    Posted by (twitter: @MetaKnighty)
    Tuesday, December 17th, 2013 1:41 am

    Hello. I didn’t make a post about my LD game yet, so here it is.

    I would have liked to put in more levels, music, blah blah, but overall I think it turned out pretty good. Give it a try.

    Play it here

    screen1

    Monochrome

    Posted by
    Sunday, December 15th, 2013 7:59 pm

    Well I made it through my first LD with Monochrome as my entry!

    It was tiring, and frustrating on occasion, but mainly it was pretty fun and I can’t wait to give it another try!

    I just wish I had learned more before starting, because I lost a lot of time learning to do some stuff for the first time, and it made me waste time on silly mistakes and work slower overall. I couldn’t do as much as I wanted, but oh well, I definitely learned a lot (although I left my code real messy :x).

    monochrome0

    In Monochrome You Only Get One color at a time. The one-colored world you see is the world you are in, but periodically the channel changes and you have to deal with another one-colored world, so be sure to move in time to arrive at an adequate position in the following color (or you may even end up stuck in walls until the world changes)! I hope you enjoy this little platformer!

     

    I’m in

    Posted by (twitter: @MetaKnighty)
    Friday, December 13th, 2013 9:31 pm

    I’m entering Ludum Dare 28.

    Tools and stuff I’ll be using:
    > FlashDevelop
    > Flashpunk
    > Tiled
    > GraphicsGale, GIMP
    > bxfr
    > goldwave
    > Musagi, pxTone or cgMusic

    I might be streaming it here.
    This is some base code I’ll be starting with.
    Download

    The Ancient Eye

    Posted by (twitter: @michailgames)
    Tuesday, October 1st, 2013 6:07 am

    When I first saw that there’s some October Challenge on LD page, I thought I don’t have a time for this… But then I read the rules and realized that I am already working on a game that fits this challenge! It’s a flash game I started to make in July and I already have planned to publish it on Kongregate this month, and eventually earn a few bucks. I must say that participating in last two LD’s (#26 and #27) was a big motivation for me to keep working on my game (not to mention the experience I gained). The thing is that this game is already about 95% done – I just need to design last two worlds and do some final polish – but I hope it is still ok for the October Challenge.

    Well, something about the game now. The title is

    The Ancient Eye

    and it is some kind of shooter/defense game. Basically you are the giant, ancient, magic eyeball and have to fight against hordes of different enemies that come in waves (there would be 10 worlds, 6 waves in each). After each wave you visit the shop and buy weapons – and that is the most important element of this game. Diffirent weapons have diffirent powers and strike areas, so you have to choose the most suitable weapons to deal with different enemies types and their configurations – and this is the key to victory. Sounds easy, but you usually you don’t have much time to think about strategy when you are surrounded by enemies. Enough of speaking, here are some screenshots:

    select_level_final

    Level selection screen

    ingame_3

    ingame_3_1

    Some in-game screenshots

    stats_with_stars

    Statistics displayed after each world

    bestiary_final

    Bestiary

    weapons_book_final

    and weapons book.

     

    I think I will publish this game in  about two weeks – so stay tuned!

    Hyper Furball!

    Posted by (twitter: @ddrkirbyisq)
    Friday, August 30th, 2013 1:05 pm

    If you haven’t already, please play and rate our game, Hyper Furball!

    Our title screen.  Cute, huh?

     

    This is my 5th Ludum Dare entry, and my second time working together with my artist xellaya.  Things came together really nicely, and I’m really proud at what we managed to do in the 72 hours.  Here’s what the game looks like:

    Scratch that mushroom!

     

    Let’s go over what went well and not as well this time around…

     

     

    What went well:

    Settling on a good concept
    We threw quite a few ideas around before settling on our sidescrolling RPG with the “hyper mode” mechanic.  Initially we were thinking about doing a Warioware style 10-second minigame collection (nothing new, but probably still fun), and were also seriously considering doing something along the lines of Off the Leash.  The idea thee was that you keep running to the right and have various obstacles and powerups that slow you down and speed you up, and you have 10 seconds to reach each checkpoint.  I was all set to start working on that when xellaya pointed out that there really wasn’t anything new about what we were making.  I thought about it some more and I agreed that it probably…wasn’t that exciting.  Friday night came and went and we still weren’t sure what we wanted to make, but eventually my train of thought went to “we should make the 10 seconds as intense and crazy as possible”, and from there I got the idea of a side-scroller where hyper mode basically involves you steamrolling a whole bunch of enemies and leveling up a bunch.  It ended up working really well, and I think it uses the theme in a way that’s clear, functional, yet non-cliche.  Awesome.

    Liberal copy-pasting of code
    There’s kind of a delicate balance when it comes to high-speed coding.  You don’t want to be clean and neat with everything, because it just takes too much time, and you’re only working with your code for one weekend anyways (not to mention, I’m the only coder here)…but you don’t want to be -so- messy that you end up introducing bugs and making things hard for yourself.  I ended up copying a lot of code from my LD26 entry Minimalist Mayhem, which I also did in Flashpunk, and that sped things up a lot, as I already had code for flashing the screen (with fadeout), and I didn’t have to think about the proper way to create/recycle objects in Flashpunk or anything like that.  There was also just a lot of one-off code that ended up getting duplicated, like the code for the parallax backgrounds–after doing that once, I just copy-pasted it each time xellaya finished a new set of backgrounds and I didn’t even have to think about it.  Yes, messy, but as long as you’re careful, it all works, and it’s fast.

    Messy?  You bet.  But I didn't have to think about it.

    Messy?  You bet.  But it meant not having to think about it at all.

    Polish!
    So many, so many Ludum Dare games are lacking in polish, but it makes such a big difference.  It’s what makes your game seem AWESOME.  That’s why it’s so important to pick something that you can execute easily, because once you finish the main execution, you can spend all the rest of your time making you game look pretty and fancy and smooth.  Screen transitions, sound effects, cleaning up your UI…all these nice little things really add up.  I’m really proud of the intro and title screen, for example–first impressions really count!  I was really excited when I put in xellaya’s graphics for the title and synced it all with the music…so proud!  Did I have to implement a jukebox screen with scrolling backgrounds (that cycle through the 4 different levels!) and colored stars flying around?  No…but it’s really neat and awesome, right?

    The Jukebox screen, where you get to listen to my music!

     

    Team Experience
    We really worked together well this time…I’m an LD vet by now, so I know how things go and I basically didn’t run into any big hiccups at all, aside from a FlashDevelop “out of heap space” compilation error which disappeared every time I restarted Flashdevelop (phew!).  I even hacked the Flashpunk Text class to get the outline effect on all my text!  I’m comfortable with Flashpunk and I’ve gotten really really good at making game soundtracks in constrained time periods now–in total, I wrote all the music in around 7 hours’ worth of time! (all that training from One Hour Compo paying off!)  xellaya was also much more set up for things this time and we didn’t run into any of the miscellaneous troubles that we had last time for Marriage Quest (pngs being exported without transparency, etc.).  We used Dropbox to get artwork from her machine onto mine; don’t know why we didn’t do that last time.  It’s important to play to your (or your team’s) strengths when you’re thinking up a game…xellaya likes drawing cute things, and I really excel with 9-bit chiptune music, so it was great that we ended up with something that allowed us to use our talents to their maximum potential.

    Scheduling
    We both had the whole weekend to work on our game, which was awesome.  No other stuff to worry about, no imminent tests or projects, no getting sick, etc.  Awesome.

     

     

    What went not quite as well:

    The Level Up screen

    UI Design
    I did better than last time (Minimalist Mayhem just had a single huge screen with all the instructions on it)–I was especially proud of the “mash space” animation that shows up on screen the first time you enter hyper mode.  But the level up screen isn’t really that intuitive…in fact, the checkboxes ended up making everyone assume that you can use your mouse to click on them.  Which…still confuses me, to be honest, but maybe that’s just because I’m an oldschool console gamer and I think everyone else is weirdos in the way that they think.  I don’t really know how this could have been better, but I didn’t spend that much effort really thinking about it.  I guess I’m just not that great at UI design.  xellaya didn’t really have the time to think about this either, though, so in the end we just did what we could, and I think it’s at least functional.  It’s not great, but probably not -bad- either.

    Gameplay Variation
    The gameplay for our game is…”decent”.  I wasn’t entirely happy with the simple attack/block mechanic that I had going on for normal combat, but I knew that it would end up being okay in the end because that’s not really the focus of the game anyways–the focus of the game is having fun with ridiculous crazy hyper mode!  Still, I wish I could have made normal combat at least a bit more interesting somehow, though I’m still not sure exactly how I would do that.  I think in the end I didn’t have time to push for enemy attack variations or anything like that, and xellaya didn’t want to do a lot of animation…if we had spent more time on this, the polish level would have suffered.  So this is not really a mistake, per se, but still wish it could have been better.  This is probably the main point that might hurt our ratings.

    Not Enough Playtesting
    Yeah, yeah, super common problem.  This always happens, really.  It’s important to get feedback and have people play your game, but…when your heads-down trying to cram in the last few features (Breaktime mode!), it just ends up by the wayside sometimes.  I think I really lucked out that the game isn’t horribly unbalanced (at least, in a way that makes it not fun), because I really didn’t have that much time to spend on that and tweaking the enemy strengths and the upgrade requirements.  I did spend a -decent- amount of time on it, which is why leveling up takes about the right amount of time and everything, so I didn’t do too bad here.  But I feel like this was a danger area that I managed to sneak by on.

     

     

    All in all, we did a great job, and I’m really proud of how things turned out.  Our game is quite fun, and I’ve been trying to see how fast I can complete it using no continues :)

    My best so far:
    Normal mode, no continues – 4:15
    Hard mode, no continues – 4:40

    Please leave your feedback and comments!  Oh, and go check out the soundtrack download too!

    Subject 18120 is trending!

    Posted by (twitter: @deammercraft)
    Wednesday, August 28th, 2013 9:41 am

    Came in to work this morning to see that our LD27 game had 1000+ gameplays on Kongregate. Turns out it’s featured on the front page of the site in the “Trending” and “Hot New Games” sections!

    Our LD27 game is on the front page of Kong!

    Our LD27 game is on the front page of Kong!

    We really want to tweak some things and add weapons, levels and music to the game for the post-jam version, so hopefully this is the start of something cool.
    Thanks to everyone who played it!

    Play it here!

    Enhanced version of Shape of shades

    Posted by (twitter: @allinlabs)
    Monday, May 13th, 2013 4:02 am

    I just wanted to let people know about the enhanced version of my game I just uploaded. It’s an abstract game where you use shadows to orient yourself and go through walls to escape enemies.

    You can play Shape of shades here : [PLAY]

    13

    11

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    Defenders of Order postmortem

    Posted by
    Tuesday, April 30th, 2013 1:31 pm

    So my first joke when I learned the theme was “My games are already minimalist.”

    I was collaborating with Anand so I could have more elaborate art than I could have made on my own, and the first thought when you think of a “minimalist game” would be red wedges shooting white circles or something.

    So on Friday we considered a few directions to take the idea that would address the theme, especially ones that would allow minimalist and non-minimalist elements to co-mingle.

    1) A non-minimalist character exploring a minimalist world.
    2) Perhaps everything is coloured rectangles until you get close to it or shine a light on it or something.
    3) A strategy game that you can switch between two different modes, one with character stats and firing ranges and things, one where they are white and black pieces that move by square.
    4) A strategy game of minimalists vs. non-minimalists

    We started going with 4, then started thinking a Tower Defense would be easiest to finish in a weekend, ( compared to a more symmetrical strategy game, where I would need to program the A.I. ) and somehow while drawing the sketches for it, we came up with the unique aiming mechanism, which you can see here:

    towers

    Note also that the towers were initially vertical boxes. The lines were meant to show where the rear towers had a clear line-of-sight, but looking at it, we thought, what if that’s how you aimed, not with a single tower, but with a pair of towers? So we seized on that as a mechanism that made the game a little more innovative than just yet another TD game, and set to work.

    I programmed it in Flashpunk, because I had used it before. Anand and I hadn’t collaborated before, so I wanted to keep the number of new things under control. I looked up a lot of things on Flash Game Dojo while the Flashpunk.net site is down.

    So here’s the result.

    After playtesting, maybe the game is a little too simplistic, which has made it tough to balance, in terms of if you make the creeps too tough, they overwhelm you no matter what you do, and if you make them too easy, you would have to go out of your way to lose. We have a couple ideas on what would add some depth to it, but by the time we thought of them, it was too late to implement them.

    IceBreaker – PostMortem

    Posted by (twitter: @pentaphobe)
    Tuesday, April 30th, 2013 1:14 pm

    Intro

    IceBreaker is a minimalist free-pause RTS-ish thing (probably better described as an FTL-like, though bearing little similarity) set in a Cyberspace similar to the one portrayed in William Gibson’s Neuromancer (a book which changed my adolescent life and is at least partially responsible for my getting into programming).

    I didn’t get much (okay, any) journal-writing done during the weekend, though there’s a vague run-down of events in the project’s github page.

    So consider this (rather large) postmortem post-hoc overcompensation. (and apologies in advance for the spam)

    Blender was extremely helpful for rapidly producing the future-retro look

    Blender was extremely helpful for rapidly producing the future-retro look very quickly, even the sprites were tiny renderings with wireframes

    You can’t quite tell, but it’s a stripped-down RTS:

    • no resources or buildings (instead you have gestation periods for replication)
    • since you can’t build unit factories, you instead have to replicate (and be vulnerable), but if you’re standing still you will heal
    • there /are/ classes, but they are restricted to *strength* (hit amount) and *vitality* (health)
    • it’s meant to be broken down into very short levels, generally with you collecting/destroying something which is being protected.

    Statistics

    • Four litres of coffee consumed
    • A whole forest of tobacco
    • 3,617 lines of code
      • That’s 60 A4 pages if printed out
      • According to Wolfram Alpha that’s:
        • about 17.8 metres ( 58 ft ) tall
        • 6.6 storeys high
        • and about half the diameter of the Hindenberg
      • Very sore wrists (hush, you!)
    • somewhere between 3 and 6 hours of sleep

    Screen shot 2013-05-01 at 5.18.22 AM

    What went wrong

    1. strong underlying system
      • unlike my last two LudumDare attempts, I knew what I wanted to do very quickly, I wrote about three pages of ideas and then stopped when I realised I’d already made my mind up to do the first one.
        However I didn’t flesh out the details as much as usual and so started building the basic framework while pondering, knowing I could change the details later on.  This resulted in a lot of code ( ~60ft worth! ) that, whilst extremely useful was probably not necessary to get the basics of the game done.
        I remain convinced that it was doable within the alotted time period (the post compo version is only an extra 4 hours work, with the last 3 mostly being unnecesary tweaking)
    2. not enough testing of environment
      • I did more preparation than previously, but I wasted time on a few things which could have been sorted out before the compo:
        • setting up the live stream stole about 1-2 hours, admittedly I was feeling a bit braindead/overwhelmed/uninspired so this was a better utilisation of time than say, nothing.  But this should have “Just Worked”
        • Final builds (I’ll get to that)
    3. using an unfamiliar framework and language (again)
      • In my first LD, I used AS3/FlashPunk which I’d picked up a couple of hours before the compo.  In the second, I used Java/LibGDX and didn’t complete – whilst I had familiarity with Java I was very very new to LibGDX and as a result spent wayy too much time googling.  This time was a fair bit better (Haxe is quite similar to Java/AS3) but I still had little to now experience with either it, or HaxePunk
      • HaxePunk is quite nice, but unfortunately not quite “there” yet for me, I wrote a disproportionately large amount of patches to the library in order to get basic features to work normally.  This stole quite a bit of time, but it was far too late in the project to change ships.  I look forward to using it more though.
    4. refactoring at the halfway point
      • despite having most of the system quite well designed in my head, I had to stop and write a vast swathe of code on day 2, partially to undo the odd choices of my sleep-deprived self the night before
    5. sleep (braindead 6+6 hours)
      • I should have done it sooner, and more.  I’m quite good without sleep, but I ran rampant on the code-base when I  started getting exhausted.  Much time was spent rectifying this spaghetti.  I’m not sure how long I actually slept (somewhere between 4 and 6 hours), but I easily lost 12 hours to silly choices and then the bleary-headedness upon waking.

        an early screenshot complete with pointless UI and ugly tiles

        an early screenshot complete with pointless UI and ugly tiles

    6. didn’t demonstrate theme clearly enough (despite following it)
      • I had basic gameplay down very early in the project this time, but the sleep-spaghetti resulted in about 10-12 hours of programming which left me (effectively) where I started
    7. planning
      • I actually planned quite well in a lot of ways, but some very fundamental (and rudimentary) aspects were overlooked initially, resulting in much confusion and wasted time
    8. submission process panic!
      • I tested my environment this time to avoid this exact thing.  However I discovered (at submission time) that whilst my project ran perfectly in the Flash standalone player, it would silently fail completely in-browser.  It turns out all I had to do was add “-web” to the build command, but it took me far too long to discover this!
    9. no end-game detection or automatic level progression
      • despite “shipping” with a few levels, the submission process issues resulted in my missing the 20 minutes that I needed to finalise this important factor of a “short-level based game” and the gameplay suffers for it.

    What went right

    1. strong underlying system
      1. Yes, it’s a dirty trick having this in both sections.  But I maintain that the approach was a good one, early efforts resulted in the tutorial system being a mere 45 minutes to implement, and most new features were added extremely quickly
      2. I used JSON for most of the configuration of the game, allowing rapid prototyping of enemy AI, character attributes, menus and the tutorial system)
    2. using Haxe and SublimeText 2
      1. This was a pretty awesome combination, I look forward to being able to justify the $70 license for SublimeText2 (this was my first real experience with it, and it was wonderful).  I have been using (shudder) Eclipse for a while despite my lack of appreciation for IDEs in general so it was nice to have a “real” development environment again.  However I’ve gotten rather dependent on Eclipse’s easy mass-refactoring, and you can really tell (names of things changed through the course of the project and thus there are some things named Agents which are actually Actors and so forth)
    3. the game idea
      1. I think this concept is pretty sound, and I enjoyed playtesting it.  Definitely building some more levels and a little more “Juice” and thrusting it in the face of anyone who walks by
    4. music and art
      1. There were a few times when my brain completely went on strike, so it was good to change gears and work in Blender or Renoise to build some of the feel, having these elements in game was also fantastic for morale.
      2. The music was made in about 5-15 minutes for each of the two tracks
      3. Art was quite quick too, despite a few false starts
    5. tutorial system
      1. I’m really happy with the tutorial system, which could also double as a mission introduction system.  It hooks into game events and each dialog of the tutorial can have a number of events required before it appears, or disappears making it very easy to make a clear (and importantly, responsive) tutorial.
    Tutorial system

    The in-game tutorial system is quite smart, if a little overenthusiastic

    Last words

    Thanks to everyone for an awesome experience yet again!

    Project source (github) | Project page | Live stream (twitch)

    I strongly encourage you to try out the Jam/Post-compo version after you’ve rated, as it’ll be a lot more clear what I was trying to achieve

    Finished!

    Posted by (twitter: @MetaKnighty)
    Sunday, April 28th, 2013 7:57 pm

    I just finished and submitted my game. I’m pretty happy with how it turned out. :D
    Play the game here.

    screen3

    Done! …and now for some lunch.

    Posted by (twitter: @ddrkirbyisq)
    Sunday, April 28th, 2013 7:57 pm

    8PM over here.  Haven’t eaten anything since waking up, sheesh.

    It’s great to be done.  Yeah, would have been nice if I had the time to get one or two more features in…can think of a lot of things I would want to add, but it’s totally fine.  Totally fine.

    Anyways, here’s Minimalist MAYHEM:

    http://www.ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-26/?action=preview&uid=7285

    Try it.  It’s pretty awesome.  And come on, how can you not try a game called Minimalist MAYHEM?  Especially with a title screen like that???

    Anyways, get some rest, everyone.  We’ll wait until we recuperate (and until the LD servers recuperate) for now.

    And of course, good luck to everyone who’s still toiling away in the jam.  You can do it!

    Let’s go!

    Posted by (twitter: @MetaKnighty)
    Friday, April 26th, 2013 4:25 pm

    I’m entering Ludum Dare 26. :)

    Tools and stuff I’ll be using:
    > FlashDevelop
    > Flashpunk
    > Tiled
    > GraphicsGale, GIMP
    > bxfr
    > goldwave
    > Musagi or cgMusic

    This is some base code I’ll be starting with. It’s mostly just for loading maps from Tiled.
    Download

    my first game this year!

    Posted by
    Tuesday, January 29th, 2013 4:21 am

    trap room

    a short puzzle about escaping from a room full of trap

    play on kongregate

    this is my first game this year, as I’m joined #onegameamonth

    this is my 3rd game so far, and actually my first non-jam game because the other two are LD game

    I created this with flashpunk+ogmo editor ex

    when i’m creating this, i’m thinking about making some simple game with simple mechanic that i actually can do it and finish it. i’m choosing puzzle genre because i think for simple game, puzzle will be the best choice. well, i dunno how this turn out before i get some feedback, but i hope you will enjoy this game…

    public var quantum_bug_fix:Boolean;

    Posted by
    Thursday, January 10th, 2013 4:55 pm

    Dear plebeians,

    I’ve posted a post-compo version of Hunter to Hunted on Kongregate. This article focuses on said event, making it a post-”post-compo post” post. The new version fixes the bugs you never encountered, includes online high scores that you can only watch from the sidelines while drooling (most likely out of retardation rather than admiration), and adds a help menu to wrap your pathetic minds around those colorful funny things moving on the screen. Radical changes weren’t needed because one can’t improve on perfection.

    Not that you’d deserve to pick the fruits of my efforts. Not that I’d expect you to understand the revolutionary nature of the gameplay after you’ve rated my entry #461 in Fun. I’m no mathematician, but it seems to imply you implied there were 460 more fun games in LD25, and that ain’t right.

    I also wrote 25 pages of witty remarks, but they’d be wasted on a bunch of illiterate rednecks, so I’ll cut this short.

    Now go to hell, and take my game with you. So you can try it out.


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