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Ludum Dare 30 — August 22nd-25th 2014 — Theme: Connected Worlds
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    Posts Tagged ‘final’

    When Worlds Collide

    Posted by
    Wednesday, August 27th, 2014 4:46 pm

    Hi everyone :) the game I created for this LD is ‘When Worlds Collide

    You can play, rate & brutally criticize it here!

    Direct unity web player link here!

    gameplay screenshot

    No this is not real space, it’s honestly a gameplay screenshot. Believe it son.

    Mechanics :

    - Randomly generated solar systems, planets, moons etc.

    - Hover your mouse over planets to see planet name, planet population, and planet wealth

    - Grapple multiple planets to haul them around the solar system

    - Solar system radar displaying location of planets and the sun

    - Player health

    - Destructible planets and moons

    - Dogfight with enemy fighters (pretty tough; got it in last minute)

     

    Keys :

    - ‘Spacebar‘ = Grapple planets

    - ‘F’ = Fullscreen

    - ‘Enter/Return’ = shoot

    - ‘R’ = Create new solar system

    - ‘WASD’ = Move up, left, down, right

    - ‘Left Click’  = Hide controls

    - ‘Mouse Hover’ = View planet information

     

    gameplay screenshot

    This one is actually a picture of real space.

     

    Extra : 

    The game is a little rough, but I feel pretty confident with how much content I got into it. There isn’t a definitive goal but it’s still an interesting free roam concept :)

    It’d be awesome if you guys & gals would check it out and tell me what you think and give it a rate. And again, criticism is encouraged. Have a good one! :)

    - Follow Me : @OfficialDingbat

    Fusebox Post Mortem

    Posted by (twitter: @empyrealhell)
    Wednesday, August 27th, 2014 12:01 am

    This past weekend I participated in the 30th Ludum Dare 48-hour competition and created Fusebox, an energy management simulation game. What follows is a summary of my experiences creating it, and what I learned from doing so. I had a lot stacked against me, and while I missed some milestones that would have taken the game from mediocre to great, I think that I did really well considering the situation. Before we can assess that though, we have to start from the beginning.

    Sure-footed as a Mountain Goat

    One week before the Ludum Dare competition started, I was at the local rock gym with a friend of mine. They had more than just rock walls there, and in my first (and most likely last) attempt at this whole slack-lining thing, I fell and landed sideways on my foot. It instantly swelled up to the size of a potato, and I haven’t been able to walk properly since. I have made a pretty decent recovery so far, but one thing I can’t do is sit up. If my foot isn’t elevated above my head, it swells back up like a balloon and becomes incredibly painful. Since working on a computer with any amount of comfort necessitates putting your feet beneath the desk, I wasn’t sure how it would turn out.

    This is what you get for hanging out with extroverted adrenaline junkies.

    This is what you get for hanging out with extroverted adrenaline junkies.

    Over the course of the weekend, my foot turned out to be both more and less of a problem than I expected. By lowering my chair, throwing a pillow on my desk, and leaning back, I could actually sit somewhat comfortably for more than an hour at my desk. It required me to be a bit twisted, and it probably wasn’t good for my back, but I was actually able to sit at the computer. Had this not been possible, I had a backup plan of writing a game in javascript from my laptop, since it can’t run Unity. In retrospect, I probably should have gone that route, but I really wanted to try this out with Unity, so I suffered through.

    The downside to this was that I couldn’t get into a position that was ideal for either my foot or for writing code. I was at least slightly uncomfortable the entire time, and several times throughout the weekend I had to stop and move to the couch to give my foot a proper rest. This had two side effects. The first was that I lost a lot of development time to laying on the couch with my foot on the back. The second was that in order to try and take advantage of this time I brought my notepad and did as much design and planning as I could while I was away from the computer. This is probably the main reason the game is so complicated and over-engineered.

    This is the first time I've taken hand-written notes in years. I had to use one of those weird scratchy tube things to scrape my thoughts in stone.

    This is the first time I’ve taken hand-written notes in years. I had to use one of those weird scratchy tube things to scrape my thoughts in stone.

    What is it Even Uniting?

    One of the main reasons I do these competitions is to force myself to try something new. I’ve used new engines, tools, or frameworks every time, and I’ve never made a game in a genre that I’ve done before. It’s a great way to learn a lot in a very short amount of time, and when you’ve been programming for a length of time measured in decades, it’s not a stretch to try and figure something out in that time frame. Since my current game project is in Unity, and I’ve been struggling with it since day, I decided that I would force myself to figure out and use Unity for this competition. In retrospect, I’m glad that I did, but it definitely slowed me down quite a bit.

    I also chose to do a very UI-intensive project this time around, for a couple of a reasons. I felt that my foot might get in the way, and I wanted something I could work on from the couch if the need arose. I also know that I hate writing interface code, mostly due to the fact that I’m not very good at designing interfaces, and I find the whole thing very tedious. I may have been setting myself up for failure here, but the goal was never to win the competition. In all of the work I’ve done on Project Dunwich, I have not even touched the interface yet. At one point I actually had to look up how to make a button. I was starting from scratch here.

    So... Much... UI Code...

    So… Much… UI Code…

    The Thought

    Despite using tools and techniques I was unfamiliar with, and dealing with Quato growing on my foot, I felt pretty good going into the competition. I had read through the list of themes, and I focused my thoughts on the highest rated candidates from the first four days of voting. This is by no means a fool-proof method of predicting the winner, and I wasn’t writing any code or committing anything to paper, just idly thinking about the design possibilities. I ran through some ideas while I went about my day, and initially I wanted to make something with more action, since my last two attempts sort of fell flat in that regard. Most of the ideas I thought of with any amount of action seemed either too obvious, or not connected enough to the theme, and UI was another focus area, so I settled for a management sim game.

    Once the theme was actually announced, I was a bit relieved that the top theme won out, since it meant I already at least knew what genre of game I would make for it. The idea was simple, connect worlds together through some interface, but give those worlds multiple, intricate layers of connection. I like to make my games hit the theme in multiple ways, and that satisfied that requirement. Connecting worlds to an energy source was the obvious take on the theme, but having them be linked to each other as well added a nice extra layer of depth to the interpretation. I’m not sure any ever notices these little touches, but it makes me feel better about my interpretations.

    I'm really happy with how the planet rendering turned out. It's a shame I never got a chance to make that interface actually useful though.

    I’m really happy with how the planet rendering turned out. It’s a shame I never got a chance to make that interface actually useful though.

    The Look

    I immediately started with graphics, since I didn’t think there would be very many, and I wanted to get it out of the way. I drew up a mock interface, some icons for the planet stats, and some graphics for the planets themselves, and actually had something passable by the end of the first night. I have used Inkscape quite a bit over the past few months, but I had never done clouds or noise in it, so that was a fun little challenge to overcome. In the end, I spent less than four hours total on graphics, and I’m glad I didn’t have to fight with them at all once I got into the interface code.

    With graphics in hand, I set to create the game objects and renderers that would use them to actually put the images on screen. Unity actually made this really easy, though I have no idea if the setup I used is proper for an entity-component system. Since most of the game objects were just data containers, that didn’t take very long, and well before the half-way mark, all I had left was to write the code to process the interactions on the game objects, and then do a whole lot of UI work. After a brief stint on the couch to rest my foot, I started in on the UI.

    It is a damn good thing I don't have to actually draw interfaces. I drew it and I can't even tell what's going on in some spots.

    It is a damn good thing I don’t have to actually draw interfaces. I drew it and I can’t even tell what’s going on in some spots.

    As I mentioned earlier, I had no idea how to approach the interface. I created things using GUIText and GUITextures, I switched to converting screen coordinates to world coordinates and driving the UI with game objects, and eventually discovered the OnGUI method and settled on using that. Throughout the course of the day on Saturday I created as many interfaces as I could, to enable interaction with the game objects. I could just as easily have started by coding that all into the setup and working on the simulation, but that seemed like it would be harder to iterate on. Once I learned how to make the interfaces, it was a pretty smooth ride of create, test for usability, modify, repeat. I didn’t do things in a very efficient way, there’s a lot of copy/pasted code for UI stuff, but I just kind of zoned out and started writing.

    The Logic

    By the end of Saturday, I had about half of the interface done, and none of the game logic. That seemed like a bad situation to be in, so I set out to right that first thing on Sunday. Since I had spent a fair amount of couch time writing out notes on how I wanted it to work, that actually went pretty fast. The logic is pretty complicated, there are a lot of moving parts that determine how the hardware will react, and how the planets will respond to their situations. The biggest problem with all of that is that I couldn’t get the interfaces done in time to actually explain all of that to the player.

    My half-baked attempt at a tutorial. The best part is that I didn't even get to implement some of the stuff I explained in here. Super useful.

    My half-baked attempt at a tutorial. The best part is that I didn’t even get to implement some of the stuff I explained in here. Super useful.

    The final interfaces were the ones that told you what was going to happen when you advanced the day, and the one that you manage your circuit board. You know, where you actually play the game. I knew what needed to be done, but by Sunday my foot was in open revolt against me. I spent a lot of that final day on the couch resting, and with nothing to plan, I just sat there mentally writing interface code to draw out how I wanted it to look. The funny thing about mentally writing out code, is that it’s a completely useless activity. When I felt good enough to try and implement it, everything fell apart on me. I had planned on whipping up those last two screens and then playtesting the game for bugs and balance. What ended up happening was a mad dash to get the interfaces working that ended about 15 minutes before the deadline.

    At Least I Finished… Sort Of

    I decided that I was done, and 15 minutes wasn’t enough time to get any of the last things I needed from where they were to where they needed to be to even be passable. I set to build my project and upload, and then Unity decided to remind me why I hate it so much. Apparently the method I was using to color the planets with HSV colors was only available when you ran the game through the editor. It wouldn’t even compile. Fortunately, HSV to RGB implementations are a easy to code, so I started throwing one together. In the past I’ve worked on them with hue being an angle from 0 to 360. Unity’s method had it as a float from 0 to 1. No sweat I thought, I’ll just multiply it by 255. If that doesn’t make sense to you, it’s because it shouldn’t. All of the planets turned green because I mixed up angles with rgb values, but I didn’t have time to figure out why. Up it went, and just like that it was all over.

    I’m glad that I made the choices I did. I learned more about unity and its UI features in this past weekend than I have in the past four months. Sure, I could have scrapped the planet interface and focused more on good UI, and I probably would have been better off spending time on tutorials rather than tweaking button positions. Given the constraints I was working under, I’m really happy with how things turned out. I do have some ideas for how to improve next time though.

    • Simple design with good balance – I had so much time away from the computer that my end product was as overly complicated mess, and there’s really no way for the average player to figure out what’s going on. Having a more simple design with a better balance would have been a better approach. Instead of having four types of compatibility and a two-hundred line calculation for fuse load, cut it down to two stats and spend more time on making sure the numbers work out over the course of the game.
    • Interaction before eye candy – My planets look way better than they need to for a game that is mainly driven by button clicks. If I had put that off until the end, I would have been able to see that before wasting time on them, and I might have had time to implement things like a proper tutorial or a win condition.
    • Playtest as early as possible – I put the core logic off for so long, that by the time I had it finished, I was already in crunch mode. This left me no time to make sure the numbers worked out, or that the game was even fun. With a game like this there’s really no excuse, I could have had unit tests written to test out the formulas and algorithms through all 100 days by Saturday morning if I had prioritized it. Good balance is going to be my main goal for next time.

    That about covers it. I had a good time, and in the end I have another game to throw on the website and say “look what I can do in a weekend.” No matter how bad I do, or how stressful it is, that sense of accomplishment will always be worth it.

    “The Other Sky” now avaliable

    Posted by (twitter: @Jishenaz)
    Monday, August 25th, 2014 7:07 pm

    icon

    If you want to wander in a surreal world, try my entry “The Other Sky”. The Ludum Dare version only has 3 levels, but hopefully I could make a better version in the future.

    I really enjoyed making this game, but I wished the I could make the levels more intricate. The theme unfortunately induced me to try to make something very ambitious. But other all I had fun.

    Screen Shot 2014-08-25 at 7.59.58 PM

    Lorries In SPAAAAACE! is done! :D

    Posted by (twitter: @AtkinsSJ)
    Monday, August 25th, 2014 11:40 am

    Click to go to the game page!

    It’s done! Since the last update, I’ve added a goal (buy all the planets), rebalanced everything to be more interesting, and added a bunch of quality-of-life improvements. (Windows stay on screen, you can rename lorries, etc.) It feels like an actual game now, and I’m really happy with it. :)

    It’s the sort of thing I might expand in the future, but currently I’ve got waaaay too many projects that need finishing first. Follow my site, or my Twitter account for more info! ;)

    Jacob’s Ladder : LD30 Compo

    Posted by
    Sunday, August 24th, 2014 7:22 pm

    My first ever Ludum Dare! I was dared by a coworker to enter and make a game on Friday!

    Enjoy playing Jacob’s Ladder here!

    Jacobs Ladder Screen Shot 2014-08-23 at 8.06.16 PM

    Jacob’s Ladder is an attempt at meeting my goals here.
    I have had many successes through the last two days!

    JacobsLadder Screen Shot 2014-08-24 at 2.25.05 PM

    [x] Intro Splashes / Animations
    [x] learned to make materials / textures / normal maps
    [x] GUI Buttons
    [x] city maze : Jacobs Ladder level
    [x] Audio, Music, Sounds
    [x] Credits
    [x] Secondary Main Menu / SubMenu
    [x] how-to-play / controls / input
    [x] footstep sounds triggered when walking

    Didn’t get around to adding :
    [ ] skybox
    [ ] Cross Maze Level (from brainstorming session at start of LD30)

    I surprised even myself on what could be done it such a limited amount of time. I learned a lot and can now add the scripts I created to a personal script library to use in other game dev projects!

    Ludum Dare For The Win!

     

    Failure

    Posted by (twitter: @jorjongames)
    Sunday, August 24th, 2014 6:33 pm

    It’s been three times in a row that I spent all my time to polishing first, and I have no gameplay at the end.

    While I admit that the visuals are not bad, nothing can compare to the fact that there is no game. So I’m a failure as a Game Developer.

    I think there’s a lot of things to learn from for next time.

    First LudumDare behind me

    Posted by
    Sunday, August 24th, 2014 5:22 pm

    OK, it’s 2AM here in Czech Republic and i think my first LD game won’t get any better. And I’m too sleepy to write a blog post…

    It’s more experiment  rather than complete game, but it was great experience and I’ve enjoyed making the graphs…

    Windows 7

    FlashDevelop

    as3 & flixel

    Photoshop

    bfxr

    Yuusss! I am done with “Rubber Slimes”!

    Posted by (twitter: @JangoBrick)
    Sunday, August 24th, 2014 4:02 pm

    I am done with my game! And I’m finally even proud of it. There was a time when I wasn’t – but that lies in the past xD

    Well, my interpretation of “Connected Worlds” was this one: Screen split in half, each half is one world. They’re connected somehow.

    And the result is some funny game with two colo[u]rful slimes, that are jumping in opposite directions, held together by a rubber band. So, connected worlds. Connected with a rubber band.
    I guess I would normally make an animated .gif and throw it into here, but I’m way too exhausted to do that now. So, have a static screenshot (don’t be sad! at least there IS a screenshot.):scr3

    Oh, and also one where the rubber band just broke (one of the more difficult levels is shown in the picture):scr4

     

    Cake

    Click here!

    Click the cake to go to the submission page, and please don’t forget to vote & comment :-)

    I’M IN!!!

    Posted by (twitter: @ZepCap)
    Sunday, August 24th, 2014 3:52 pm

    Never got around to making one of these posts. I used

    • GameMaker: Studio
    • Photoshop
    • Audacity
    • The microphone on my iPhone earplugs
    • Amazing people at the Århus, Denmark meet-up

    to make this game, that I just submitted, called Twist and Weave: http://www.ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-30/?action=preview&uid=27032

    Has anyone made a game about Nokia: connecting people?

     

    My third Ludum Dare game, and my best entry so far. Go try it! It’s fun and unique and buzzword!

    Vaults Inc will become a full game

    Posted by (twitter: @twitter.com/brmassa)
    Wednesday, May 7th, 2014 6:13 pm

    for the reasons I mentioned in http://blog.gamenific.com/2014/05/the-power-of-good-feedback-new-game.html, I am very proud to announce that my Ludum Dare 29 entry, Vaults Inc, will become a full feature game. Thanks for everyone that played and gave me crucial feedback.

    Future development

    The game needs to go back to design. Not only there are several features that I could not implement, but also I have to give a total remake on things that already done.

    From a quick list, here are some items:

    • Save and Load functionality: auto explaining and the benefits are quite obvious
    • Graphical revamp: it was one top complains from LD players and not with reason
    • Bots: a computer opponent for single player
    • New game play features: challenges and empty blocks are among the things I want to implement to make the game richer
    • Campaign mode: for single players, with specific scenarios
    • Multi player: online and local
    • Social: comparing scores with friends
    • Multi platform: PC, Mac, Android an iOS for sure. Other platforms could be considered

     

    If you have not played yet, Play it now!

    vaults inc LD29 logovaults inc title vaults inc LD29 6 vaults inc LD29 4 vaults inc LD29 3 vaults inc LD29 5

    My LD29 game + gameplay/review video of it!

    Posted by (twitter: @SixtenKastalje)
    Friday, May 2nd, 2014 2:20 pm

    Hi Ludum Dare folks, so for the LD29 Compo I made a game called Alien Cyclope Miner on Mars. It’s my first game for a LD Compo, and so far I’ve got a lot of positive feedback which is great :D

    It’s some kind of Minecraft/Terraria/Starbound etc. inspired game, about mining, building and just getting resources.

    LD29-screen-1

     

    I might make an update to the game where I add the features I didn’t make in time, and some other cool stuff such as:

    - Enemies (feat. the famous Pepsi Consultant)

    - Craftable weapons and tools

    - More ores, and new blocks to build with

    - Controls fixes, so that you don’t have to use mousewheel

    - Other bug fixes

     

    Another cool thing is that the very nice guy Caridorc made a little review/gameplay of my game and put it on YouTube :D

    Also check his game out :D

    Whistle submitted

    Posted by (twitter: @AhNinniah)
    Tuesday, April 29th, 2014 9:50 am

    Finally, after getting some sleep, we can say that our game was successfully submitted. It was the first time when we made a horror game with self-made sound effects. Although “Whistle” has some ugly bugs the experience was really interesting, and we are almost happy with the result. Not everything went as we wanted, that’s why we are going to fix that in Post Compo version. It would be great to get some feedback, so please check our game here

    Park_5

    In our turn, we want to congratulate all of you who reached the finish line! It’s time to play and rate all these great games now :)

    House_5

    Play Tiny Haunt!

    Posted by (twitter: @rojomojogogo)
    Monday, April 28th, 2014 7:23 pm

    Whew!  My entry for LD29 is up as of a couple hours ago.  It’s a sandboxy physics game where you play as a poltergeist defending your castle from invading knights.

    Go play it!

    Tiny Haunt screenshot

    If you leave a comment of any kind it’s very likely that I’ll end up playing your game sometime in the next week, so keep that in mind!  I’m sure that goes for a lot of the other developers as well.

    level2

    I may do a postmortem later in the week.  For now it’s time to chill out with some whiskey and play some games!

    Play Tiny Haunt

    Symptomatic Retrospective

    Posted by (twitter: @AndyGainey)
    Monday, April 28th, 2014 6:43 pm

    The following was originally posted on my own site at experilous.com/1/blog/post/ludum-dare-29-retrospective.  Some additional white board images are included there.

    Ludum Dare is over, and my entry, Symptomatic, can be viewed here (or jump straight to the game itself on my website:  experilous.com/1/ludum-dare-29/).  The non-competition jammers are probably wrapping up their 72-hour game jam entries as I type, but having done the 48-hour competition, I’ve had the luxury of relaxing for a full 24 hour already.  Time to look back and reflect.

    What a confusing tangled mess!

    (more…)


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